Uncanny Authors

LaShawn M. Wanak

LaShawn M. Wanak lives in Madison, WI, with her husband and son. Her works can be found in Strange Horizons, Podcastle, and Daily Science Fiction. She reviews books for Lightspeed Magazine and is a graduate of the 2011 class of Viable Paradise. Writing stories keeps her sane. Also, pie.

Stu West

Born in Scotland, Stu West studied, variously, Film, Biology, and Creative Writing at Glasgow University and spent a decade working in biotechnology. He has written horror scripts for Imperium Comics and his fiction has appeared in Fireside Magazine. He lives in Ottawa with his Canadian wife and their two cats.

Kayla Whaley

Kayla Whaley is a graduate of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop and an editor at Disability in Kidlit. Her work has appeared in Uncanny MagazineThe Toast, and is forthcoming in the anthology Feminism for the Real World (Algonquin Young Readers). She lives outside Atlanta with too many books and not nearly enough cats.

Jessica P. Wick

Jessica P. Wick is a writer, poet, and an editor of poetry at Goblin Fruit. Her work has appeared in Strange Horizons, Mythic Delirium, Cabinet des Fees, and Jabberwocky. She has recently moved from the West Coast to the East, and when she isn’t dipping her toes in the sea she is regarding the first snow flurries with smug recognition and wide–eyed wariness.

Troy L. Wiggins

Troy L. Wiggins a writer and editor living in Memphis, Tennessee. Troy is co-editor of FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction. His short fiction and essays have appeared in Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction From the Margins of History, Expanded Horizons, Memphis Noir, and Fireside Fiction Magazine. You can follow his musings on race and nerd culture at afrofantasy.net, and follow him on Twitter @TroyLWiggins.

Fran Wilde

Fran Wilde’s novels and short stories have been finalists for three Nebula awards, two Hugo Awards, and a World Fantasy Award. They include her Andre Norton- and Compton Crook-winning debut novel, Updraft (Tor, 2015); its sequels, Cloudbound and Horizon; the middle-grade novel Riverland (forthcoming from Abrams in April 2019); and the novelette “The Jewel and Her Lapidary.” Her short stories appear in Asimov’s, Tor.com, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Shimmer, Nature, and the 2017 Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror. “Clearly Lettered in a Mostly Steady Hand,” which appeared in Uncanny, was a finalist for the Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy Award, and won the 2018 Eugie Foster Memorial Award. You can find her on Twitter, Facebook, and at franwilde.net.

photo by Kyle Cassidy

Eli Wilkinson

Eli Wilkinson writes science fiction and horror stories. He lives and works in the frozen wastelands of Canada.

A.C. Wise

A.C. Wise’s fiction has appeared in publications such as Shimmer, The Dark, and The Best Horror of the Year Volume 10, among other places. She has two short fiction collections published by Lethe Press, and a weird Southern Gothic novella published by Broken Eye Books (August 2019). In addition to fiction, her Women to Read and Non-Binary Authors to Read series can be found at The Book Smugglers. She blogs sporadically at acwise.net and tweets slightly more frequently (mostly sharing pictures of her corgis) as @ac_wise.

G. Willow Wilson

G. Willow Wilson is the author of the acclaimed novel The Bird King (2019), co-creator of the Hugo and American Book Award-winning series Ms Marvel (2013-2018), and has written for some of the world’s best-known superhero comic book series, including The X-Men, Superman, and Wonder Woman. Her first novel, Alif the Unseen, won the 2013 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel, was a finalist for the Center For Fiction’s First Novel Prize, and was long-listed for the 2013 Women’s Prize for Fiction. In 2015, she won the Graphic Literature Innovator Prize at the PEN America Literary Awards. Her work has been translated into over a dozen languages. She lives in Seattle.

John Wiswell

John (@Wiswell) is a disabled writer who lives where New York keeps all its trees. His work has previously appeared in Nature Futures, Fireside Magazine, and Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction. He will always be grateful to comics for helping teach him to read.