Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Uncanny Celebrates Reader Favorites of 2020!

Hello, Space Unicorns! 2020 was a tough year. Though many things were hard and horrible, we are very, very proud of all of the amazing works we published in Uncanny Magazine. Everyone in the Space Unicorn Ranger Corps has been wonderfully supportive, and your enthusiasm has meant so much to us. It’s been fantastic to see how much our readers have been enjoying Uncanny’s fiction. And while we have our personal favorites, we’d like to know which stories YOU loved from Uncanny in 2020.

We’ve set up a poll for Uncanny readers to vote for their top three favorite original short stories from 2020. (You can find links to all of the stories here.)

The poll will be open from January 11 to February 8, after which we’ll announce the results. We’re excited for you to share which Uncanny stories made you feel!

snazzy certificate will be given to the creator whose work comes out on top of  the poll!

So please spread the word! And don’t forget, EVERY VOTE COUNTS!

Uncanny Magazine 2020 Poetry Eligibility

Hello, Space Unicorns! Nominating for the Rhysling Award for speculative poetry is open! If you’re a SFPA member, you can nominate short and long poetry up until February 15 for the 2021 Rhysling Award. Uncanny Magazine’s eligible poems from 2020 are:

 

Short poems (1-49 lines or prose poems 0-99 words)

Who Do You Think You Are by Ada Hoffman  

The Death of the Gods by Leah Bobet  

A tenjō kudari (“ceiling hanger” yōkai) defends her theft  

Other Worlds to Save by Beth Cato  

Hungry Ghost by Millie Ho  

behind the self-help section by D.A. Xiaolin Spires  

Νόστιμον Ήμαρ by Eva Papasoulioti  

Athena Holds Up a Mirror to Strength by Ali Trotta  

Assimilation by Valerie Valdes  

ask them who is doing the haunting (a vietnamese american underwater fairytale) by T.K. Lê  

saltwashed by Jennifer Mace  

The Trouble Over by Sonya Taaffe  

fair exchange by Ewen Ma  

Fin by Terese Mason Pierre  

As if My Flesh was Summer Soil by Lora Gray  

Mourning Becomes Jocasta by Jane Yolen (paired with An Elder Resigns from the Chorus of Oedipus at Colonnus by Peter Tacy)

An Elder Resigns from the Chorus of Oedipus at Colonnus by Peter Tacy (paired with Mourning Becomes Jocasta by Jane Yolen)

Cento for Lagahoos by Brandon O’Brien  

The Automaton Falls in Love by Jennifer Crow  

Making Accommodations by Valerie Valdes  

 

Long poems (50+ lines or prose poems 500+ words)

Elegy for the Self as Villeneuve’s Belle by Brandon O’Brien  

deep sleep by Roshni Chokshi  

lagahoo culture (Part I) by Brandon O’Brien  

My Cat, He by Beth Cato  

The Body in Revolt by Rita Chen  

Uncanny Magazine Issue 38 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming January 5, THE THIRTY-EIGHTH ISSUE OF THE 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020 HUGO AWARD-WINNING UNCANNY MAGAZINE!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on February 2.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

The cover of Uncanny Magazine, Issue 38 (January/February 2021). A Black elf wearing silver armor and a red cape, while holding a sword, receives a blessing upon her bowed head from a pair of brown hands, with a bracelet and bangle around their wrists. The owner of the hands isn’t pictured further beyond a shimmery blue dress. The word “UNCANNY” and the names of the contributors border the image.

Uncanny Magazine Issue 38 Table of Contents:

Cover:
Stars and Blessings by Nilah Magruder

Editorials:
“The Uncanny Valley” by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
“Imagining Futures: Where Our Works Go from Here” by Elsa Sjunneson

Fiction:
“Tyrannosaurus Hex” by Sam J. Miller (1/5)
“A House Full of Voices Is Never Empty” by Miyuki Jane Pinckard (1/5)
“Pathfinding!” by Nicole Kornher-Stace (1/5)

“Distribution” by Paul Cornell (2/2)
“Femme and Sundance” by Christopher Caldwell (2/2)
“Beyond the Doll Forest” by Marissa Lingen (2/2)

Reprint:
“In That Place She Grows a Garden” by Del Sandeen (2/2)

Nonfiction:
“Weird Plagues: How Fear of Disease Mutated into a Subgenre” by John Wiswell (1/5)
“Milk Teeth” by Octavia Cade (1/5)

“Trash Fantasias, or Why Mass Effect 3’s Ending Was Bad Actually” by Katherine Cross (2/2)
“Hayao Miyazaki’s Lost Magic of Parenthood” by Aidan Moher (2/2)

Poetry:
“Medusa Gets a Haircut” by Theodora Goss (1/5)
“Kalevala, an untelling” by Lizy Simonen (1/5)
“bargain | bin” by Ewen Ma (1/5)

“Fish Out of Water” by Neil Gaiman (2/2)
“What The Time Travellers Stole” by L.X. Beckett (2/2)

Interviews:
Miyuki Jane Pinckard interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (1/5)

Paul Cornell interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (2/2)

Podcasts:

Episode 38A (January 5): Editors’ Introduction, “Tyrannosaurus Hex” by Sam J. Miller, as read by Joy Piedmont, “Medusa Gets a Haircut” by Theodora Goss, as read by Erika Ensign, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Sam J. Miller.

Episode 38B (February 2): Editors’ Introduction, “Femme and Sundance” by Christopher Caldwell, as read by Matt Peters, “What The Time Travellers Stole” by L.X. Beckett, as read by Joy Piedmont, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Christopher Caldwell.

 

Uncanny Magazine Managing Editor Chimedum Ohaegbu Is Also Now the Poetry Editor!

Fabulous news, Space Unicorns! Uncanny Magazine’s Managing Editor Chimedum Ohaegbu is getting an additional title! Along with being Uncanny’s PHENOMENAL Managing Editor, Chimie will now have the additional title of Poetry Editor starting with issue 39!

We are super excited to have Chimie increase her involvement in this area. Congratulations, Chimie!

A reminder that Uncanny Magazine will be open to poetry submissions from January 4 to January 18!

Uncanny Magazine 2020 Award Eligibility

It’s the time of year when people post their year-in-reviews to remind voters for the different SF/F awards what’s out there that they might have missed and which categories those stories are eligible in (especially for the Hugo Awards and Nebula Awards). 2020 was the sixth full year of Uncanny Magazine (Issues 32 through 37). We are extremely proud of the year we had.

This year, Uncanny Magazine is still eligible for the Best Semiprozine Hugo Award. Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas are also still eligible for the Best Editor (Short Form) Hugo Award for editing issues 32-37. (Note: If you are nominating the Thomases in this category, please continue to nominate them together. They are a co-editing team.)

The stories listed below are eligible in either the short story or novelette categories of the SF/F awards. If you are a SFWA member nominating for the Nebula Awards, you can find eBook copies of these stories in the SFWA Forums.

Please also note that essays are eligible for the Best Related Work Hugo Award, and poetry is eligible for the Rhysling Award. As Uncanny is a semiprozine, all of the essays and original art also contribute towards the creators’ Best Fan Writer and Best Fan Artist Hugo Award eligibility.

 

Novelettes (7500-17,500 Words):

Where You Linger by Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam

Burn or The Episodic Life of Sam Wells as a Super by A. T. Greenblatt

The Inaccessibility of Heaven by Aliette de Bodard

 

Short Stories (Under 7500 Words):

Badass Moms in the Zombie Apocalypse by Rae Carson

You Perfect, Broken Thing by C.L. Clark

My Country Is a Ghost by Eugenia Triantafyllou

And All the Trees of the Forest Shall Clap Their Hands by Sharon Hsu

The Spirit of the Leech by Alex Bledsoe

If Salt Lose Its Savor by Christopher Caldwell

The Sycamore and the Sybil by Alix E. Harrow

So You Want to Be a Honeypot by Kelly Robson

If You Want to Erase Us, You Must Be Thorough by L. Tu

Getaway by Nicole Kornher-Stace

Georgie in the Sun by Natalia Theodoridou

Through the Veil by Jennifer Marie Brissett

A Being Together Amongst Strangers by Arkady Martine

High in the Clean Blue Air by Emma Törzs

Dresses Like White Elephants by Meg Elison

We Chased the Sirens by Suzanne Walker

A Pale Horse by M Evan MacGriogair

A Love Song for Herkinal

as composed by Ashkernas amid the ruins of New Haven by Chinelo Onwualu

Once More Unto the Breach (But Don’t Worry, the Inflatable Swords Are Latex-Free) by Tina Connolly

The World Ends in Salty Fingers and Sugared Lips by Jenn Reese

The Nine Scents of Sorrow by Jordan Taylor

The Ruby of the Summer King by Mari Ness

Anchorage by Samantha Mills

Laws of Impermanence by Kenneth Schneyer

Metal Like Blood in the Dark by T. Kingfisher

Juvenilia by Lavie Tidhar

In The Space of Twelve Minutes by James Yu

The City of the Tree by Marie Brennan

Proof of Existence by Hal Y. Zhang

50 Things Every AI Working with Humans Should Know by Ken Liu

Words We Say Instead by Brit E. B. Hvide

The Bottomless Martyr by John Wiswell

The Salt Witch by Martha Wells

The Span of His Wrist by Lee Mandelo

Uncanny Magazine Issue 37 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming November 3, THE THIRTY-SEVENTH ISSUE OF THE 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020 HUGO AWARD-WINNING UNCANNY MAGAZINE!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on December 1.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

Uncanny Magazine Issue 37 Table of Contents

Cover:
Treetops by Julie Dillon

Editorials:
“The Uncanny Valley” by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
“Imagining Futures: They’re Trying to Sell You A Haunted House” by Elsa Sjunneson

Fiction:
“50 Things Every AI Working with Humans Should Know” by Ken Liu (11/3)
“Proof of Existence” by Hal Y. Zhang (11/3)
“Words We Say Instead” by Brit E.B. Hvide (11/3)

“The Salt Witch” by Martha Wells (12/1)
“The Span of His Wrist” by Lee Mandelo (12/1)
“The Bottomless Martyr” by John Wiswell (12/1)

Reprint:
“Cerulean Memories” by Maurice Broaddus (12/1)

Nonfiction:
“Evoking the Gothic: The House That Anxiety Built” by Meghan Ball (11/3)
“Black and White and Red All Over: On the Semiotic Effect of Color (11/3)
Printing in Genre Fiction” by Meg Elison (11/3)

“Traveling Without Moving” by Michi Trota (12/1)
“This Isn’t the End: On Becoming a Writing Parent” by K.A. Doore (12/1)

Poetry:
“Mourning Becomes Jocasta” by Jane Yolen (11/3)
“An Elder Resigns from the Chorus of Oedipus at Colonnus” by Peter Tacy (11/3)
“Cento for Lagahoos” by Brandon O’Brien (11/3)

“Making Accommodations” by Valerie Valdes (12/1)
“The Automaton Falls in Love” by Jennifer Crow (12/1)

Interviews:
Ken Liu Interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (11/3)

Lee Mandelo Interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (12/1)

Podcasts:

Episode 37A (November 3): Editors’ Introduction, “Proof of Existence” by Hal Y. Zhang, as read by Joy Piedmont, “Mourning Becomes Jocasta” by Jane Yolen and “An Elder Resigns from the Chorus of Oedipus at Colonnus,” by Peter Tacy, as read by Erika Ensign, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Hal Y. Zhang.

Episode 37B (December 1): Editors’ Introduction, “The Salt Witch” by Martha Wells, as read by Erika Ensign, “Making Accommodations” by Valerie Valdes, as read by Joy Piedmont, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Martha Wells.

 

Tananarive Due’s “Black Horror Rising” Won the Best in Creative Nonfiction Ignyte Award!

Fabulous news, Space Unicorns! Tananarive Due’s “Black Horror Risingwon the Best in Creative Nonfiction Ignyte Award! A huge congratulations to Tananarive!

Once again,  congratulations to Christopher Caldwell, whose “Canst Thou Draw Out the Leviathan” was a finalist for a Best Short Story Ignyte Award, Brandon O’Brien, whose “Elegy for the Self as Villeneuve’s Beast” was a finalist for a Best in Speculative Poetry Ignyte Award, Tamara Jerée, whose “goddess in forced repose” was a Best in Speculative Poetry Ignyte Award finalist, and Uncanny Magazine Interviewer Caroline M. Yoachim, whose “The Archronology of Love” was a Best Novelette Ignyte Award finalist!

It was a fabulous ballot. Congratulations to all of the winners and finalists!

Why We Love the Uncanny in Fiction– A Guest Post by Paula Guran

The idea of the uncanny has been explored for 150 years or more by a host of brilliant minds—Sigmund Freud, Jacques Derrida, and Nicholas Royle to name only a few. Even if confined only to its context in fiction, current scholars still debate its definition.

Freud’s 1919 essay “Das Unheimliche” is, however, a universally cited reference when dealing with a description of the uncanny. We might as well start there.

Freud begins with the etymology of the German word unheimlich, which he says shows the uncanny is “that class of the frightening which leads back to what is known of old and long familiar.” Heimlich means “homely”—familiar, mundane, intimate, friendly. But here’s also an implication of secrecy, concealment, something being withheld from others. Add the prefix un (which shares its negative effect with English) to heimlich, and the result is a term for the eerie and uneasy. Freud then quotes German philosopher F. W. J. Schelling’s Philosophy of Mythology: “Unheimlich is the name for everything that ought to have remained… hidden and secret and has become visible.” Unheimlich: uncanny.

Now that we’re somewhat grounded, let’s keep it (overly) simple: when we encounter the uncanny in fiction we usually have started out in a familiar world or, at least, a world that is intimately recognizable to a story’s characters. Then a divergence occurs, the easily comprehensible is no longer so understandable, and a certain disorientation occurs. We feel uneasy. But within this discombobulation, there is also a change in perception, a revelation of sorts. Within the dream, there is awakening. We are awake, but we are changed. Fiction has realigned our reality.

Sounds all psychedelic or woo-woo, doesn’t it? But I think you know what I mean.

Consider some well-known classic examples: “The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe (1839), A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (1843), The Turn of the Screw by Henry James (1898), or “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1892). Life seems “normal” until a literal crack appears in the edifice, or ghostly figures appear, or the wallpaper mutates. Things begin to unravel and the reader feels it.

Those stories affect me, stay with me. That’s why I love finding the uncanny in fiction.

I chose three stories from Uncanny Magazine’s 2019 issues for The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror, Volume One (despite the title, it is the eleventh in the series): Fran Wilde’s “A Catalog of Storms” (Uncanny Issue 26), “Nice Things” by Ellen Klages (Uncanny Issue 28), and “The Blur in the Corner of Your Eye” by Sarah Pinsker (Uncanny Issue 29). Several more are also listed as recommended reads. Let’s look at the effect of the uncanny in one of them.

In Ellen Klages’s “Nice Things,” Phoebe Morris is sorting through her recently deceased mother’s belongings. A sad but mundane task—until a certain folder isn’t where she put it and, when discovered, includes a note in her mother’s “distinctive script.” Phoebe rationalizes this uncanny event and returns to the everyday and her orderly process.

The uncanny intrudes again with sounds and smells. The impossible is happening. By the end of the story we realize just how much has changed.

Neither this or the other stories are particularly scary; few would call them horror. But in all of them, the uncanny enters and they become unsettling tales—dark fantasy, for lack of another term. And, chances are, they will alter readers perceptions enough that those stories will stay with them for a long time.

That’s what happened to me when I read them. That’s how I wound up considering them among the “best” of the year.

As a reader of Uncanny, you may have already found these stories, but I promise that among the other twenty-one stories in The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror, Volume One you will come across the uncanny again and again.

(You can find out more about The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror, Volume One here!)

Paula Guran has edited almost fifty science fiction, fantasy, and horror anthologies and more than fifty novels and collections featuring the same. She’s reviewed and written articles for dozens of publications. She lives in Akron, Ohio, with her faithful cat Nala, near enough to her grandchildren to frequently be indulgent.

 

 

 

 

 

Uncanny Magazine Issue 36 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming September 1, THE THIRTY-SIXTH ISSUE OF THE 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020 HUGO AWARD-WINNING UNCANNY MAGAZINE!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on October 6.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

Uncanny Magazine Issue 36 Table of Contents

Cover:
Connected by Christopher Jones

Editorials:
“The Uncanny Valley” by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas (9/1)
“Imagining Place: Worldbuilding As” by Elsa Sjunneson (9/1)

Fiction:
“Metal Like Blood in the Dark” by T. Kingfisher (9/1)
“Anchorage” by Samantha Mills (9/1)
“Laws of Impermanence” by Kenneth Schneyer (9/1)

“Juvenilia” by Lavie Tidhar (10/6)
“The City of the Tree” by Marie Brennan (10/6)
“In The Space of Twelve Minutes” by James Yu (10/6)

Reprint:
“The Mouser of Peter the Great” by P. Djèlí Clark (9/1)

Nonfiction:
“Finding Myself in Speculative Fiction Again After Leaving Other Worlds Behind” by Del Sandeen (9/1)
“The Roots of Hope: Toward an Optimistic Near-Future SF in a Pandemic” by Marissa Lingen (9/1)

“Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Excellence” by Nibedita Sen (10/6)
“Sticks and String” by Christopher Mark Rose (10/6)

Poetry:
“Fin” by Terese Mason Pierre (9/1)
“My Cat, He” by Beth Cato (9/1)

“The Body in Revolt” by Rita Chen (10/6)
“As if My Flesh was Summer Soil” by Lora Gray (10/6)

Interviews:
Kenneth Schneyer interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (9/1)

Lavie Tidhar interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (10/6)

Podcasts:

Episode 36A (September 1): “Metal Like Blood in the Dark” by T. Kingfisher, as read by Erika Ensign, “Fin” by Terese Mason Pierre, as read by Joy Piedmont, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing T. Kingfisher.

Episode 36B (October 6): Editors’ Introduction, “In The Space of Twelve Minutes” by James Yu, as read by Joy Piedmont, “As if My Flesh was Summer Soil” by Lora Gray, as read by Erika Ensign, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing James Yu.

 

An Uncanny Story, 2 Poems, and an Essay Are Ignyte Award Finalists!!!

Fabulous news, Space Unicorns! An Uncanny Magazine story, 2 poems, and an essay are Ignyte Award finalists! Congratulations to Christopher Caldwell! “Canst Thou Draw Out the Leviathan” is a finalist for a Best Short Story Ignyte Award! Congratulations to Brandon O’Brien! “Elegy for the Self as Villeneuve’s Beast” is a finalist for a Best in Speculative Poetry Ignyte Award! Congratulations to Tamara Jerée! “goddess in forced repose” is a Best in Speculative Poetry Ignyte Award finalist! And Congratulations to Tananarive Due! “Black Horror Rising” is a Best in Creative Nonfiction Ignyte Award finalist!

Plus, congratulations to Uncanny Magazine Interviewer Caroline M. Yoachim! “The Archronology of Love” is a Best Novelette Ignyte Award finalist!

It is a fabulous ballot. Congratulations to all of the finalists!

From the Ignyte Award website:

The FIYAHCON 2020 Committee is thrilled to announce the finalists for the inaugural Ignyte Awards. The Awards seek to celebrate the vibrancy and diversity of the current and future landscapes of science fiction, fantasy, and horror by recognizing incredible feats in storytelling and outstanding efforts toward inclusivity of the genre. To that effect, the committee feels that these creators, creations, entities, and perspectives from 2019 represent the brightest lights in speculative fiction’s future. We encourage you to seek out the nominees unfamiliar to you on this list, engage with their works of fiction or acts of community, and to use those experiences to inform your vote.

The short list is derived from 15 BIPOC voters on the FIYAHCON staff, of varying genders, sexualities, cultures, disabilities, and locations throughout the world. They are referred to as the Ignyte Awards Committee. Committee members were not permitted to nominate their own works or works of which they were a part. The Committee was not limited to selections authored or otherwise created by BIPOC. Public voting on the shortlist does not permit write-in nominations. We intend to ask one year’s winners to be part of the subsequent year’s committee to ensure fresh perspectives and to help prevent repeated nominations of the same popular authors as recognized in many other genre awards. Details on that process as well as the longlist and the process of submitting works for consideration will be released after FIYAHCON 2020

Voting is now open to the public through September 11th at 11:59 PM Eastern Time. Click here to vote.

Inquiries can be forwarded to director(at)theconvention.fiyahlitmag.com.