Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Uncanny Magazine Issue 16 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming May 2, THE SIXTEENTH ISSUE OF 2016 HUGO AWARD-WINNING & 2017 HUGO FINALIST UNCANNY MAGAZINE!!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on June 6.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

This issue will coincide with our Weightless Books Subscription Drive for a year’s worth of Uncanny Magazine eBooks. The drive will run from May 2-May 16. For that limited time, people can receive a year’s worth of Uncanny for $2 off the regular price. We will have some nifty giveaways for a few lucky new or renewing subscribers at particular milestones, too. (T-shirts! Back issues! Fancy custom tea blends! Tote bags!). And all new or renewing subscribers will get a vinyl Space Unicorn sticker and a Space Unicorn temporary tattoo!

Cover:

Galen Dara- “The Nas*T* Lady Doth Persist”

Editorial:

The Uncanny Valley (5/2)

Fiction:

Ursula Vernon- “Sun, Moon, Dust” (5/2)
John Chu- “Making the Magic Lightning Strike Me” (5/2)
Chinelo Onwualu- “Read Before Use” (5/2)

Naomi Kritzer- “Paradox” (6/6)
Hiromi Goto- “Notes from Liminal Spaces” (6/6)
K.M. Szpara – “Small Changes Over Long Periods of Time” (6/6)

Reprint:

Carlos Hernandez- “Origins” (5/2)

Essays:

Javier Grillo-Marxuach- “In Praise of Deus (Ex Machina)” (5/2)
Sarah Gailey – “City of Villains: Why I Don’t Trust Batman” (5/2)
Sam J. Miller- “Resistance 101: Basics of Community Organizing for SF/F Creators & Consumers; Volume Two: Deepening Your Engagement” (5/2)
Sarah Pinsker- “Meeting with Your Legislators 101 and 201” (5/2)
Mimi Mondal- “Missive from a Woman in a Room in a City in a Country in a World Not Her Own” (5/2)

David J. Schwartz- “How Deep Space Nine Almost Didn’t Fail Me” (6/6)
Kelly McCullough- “The Resistance—Becoming A Local Politician” (6/6)
LaShawn Wanak – “Learning to Turn Your Lips Sideways” (6/6)
Yamile Saied Méndez- “Nunca Más” (6/6)
DongWon Song- “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Eat the Damn Eyeball” (6/6)

Poetry:

Roshani Chokshi- “Dancing Princesses” (5/2)
Sonya Taaffe- “Twenty Seventy-One” (5/2)

Betsy Aoki- “What to expect from the Hadron Collider as a college roommate” (6/6)
Theodora Goss- “Seven Shoes” (6/6)

Interviews:

Interview with John Chu (5/2)
Interview with Hiromi Goto (6/6)

Podcasts:

16A (5/2)
Ursula Vernon- “Sun, Moon, Dust” (As read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Roshani Chokshi- “Dancing Princesses” (As read by Erika Ensign)
Julia Rios Interviews Ursula Vernon

16B (6/6)
Naomi Kritzer- “Paradox” (As read by Erika Ensign)
Theodora Goss- “Seven Shoes” (As read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Julia Rios Interviews Naomi Kritzer

The Fallacy of Agency: on Power, Community, and Erasure

(Guest post by Aliette de Bodard with art by Likhain)

We talk about agency a lot in writing: that attractive characters, suitable heroes, and role models are in control, or if they are not, this is because their character arc leads them to being in control—the conflict involved in being in charge of one’s own destiny being the quintessential, most interesting one in fiction.

I don’t want to suggest that having agency is not a worthy goal (it is!) but by over-focusing on it, often to the detriment of everything else, we devalue two things: powerlessness, and depending on others.

Madeleine, one of the characters from my book The House of Binding Thorns. For most of the book, she has little agency in the conventional sense: no overt power and no desire to gain any, and no hidden talent for either magic or diplomacy (both of which are the big power drivers in the universe). But she still has her story. (Art by Likhain.)

It’s worth asking what kind of power is talked about when we say that a character “lacks agency”: overwhelmingly, this is an overt perception of power. It’s the act of being brashly in charge, of controlling things at a large scale, and disproportionately being in a position to inflict violence or go to war. The “covert” perception—political influence via quiet words in someone’s ears, shadow courts, or other means—is either inexistent or devalued. It’s also the act of having the title as opposed to having actual power: there’s a persistent fantasy that only the person named as being in charge gets any influence to do anything, as if spouses and advisors were just here for show—the Louis XIV fantasy of the absolute monarch pushed to absurd extremes (it’s worth noting that Louis XIV promoted this idea to try and silence the nobility, who controlled enormous amounts of land and power at the Versailles court).

The other thing about dismissing powerlessness is that it devalues and erases the oppressed. It’s saying, essentially, that the less power one has, the less worthy of a story one is. That if someone is truly oppressed, and the story isn’t about some brash rebellion, some gaining of that overt power, then it’s not worth telling. That being oppressed is some sort of grey, featureless state where nothing worth notice happens—that there are no sorrows, no joys, no everyday struggles, no little victories to be snatched. That, in short, the only story of oppression worth telling is the brazen breaking of it.

The other thing that overemphasising agency does is that it makes it sound like a bad thing to be dependent on others, and especially being part of a community you can rely on. This is problematic on several levels: the first and most important one is that we are not and were not meant to be self-reliant (raising a child, for instance, is seen today as the job of a nuclear family, but it’s frazzling and exhausting and really much easier if we come back to the way it was done: by the extended family/community). Admitting that one can’t do everything alone isn’t a moral failing or a weakness: it’s deeply and fundamentally human.

The second is that many things in life, especially the largest ones that genre narrative patterns are so fond of, are really achieved by several people. And, by “several people” I mean dozens or hundreds rather than just a hero and a sidekick (though frequently, even the hero being dependent on the sidekick is seen as a lack of agency). There’s a great symbolic weight put on a hero’s capacity to “shine” at the end by doing something all on their own, but the larger the thing is and the larger its consequences, the less realistic it is that a single Chosen one could actually accomplish it with no help.

And, finally, “being in control” is a bit of a fallacy as well: the underlying assumption is that there is some sort of ideal state where a person can master everything that happens to them. But, in real life, many things are outside our control, and that remains true no matter how much power we might hold: we don’t get a say in illnesses or natural disasters, to take just two extreme examples, but even small things, like a car accident happening along our commute, are also outside our control. And sometimes, the goal isn’t to take charge and change them—but to bow down, to accept, to recognise that we aren’t the masters, and to see how we might best accommodate unmovable facts. By promoting a narrative of agency, we’re also promoting a narrative of shame: that illnesses are always our fault and our moral failing—that not being cured means that you’re not doing enough, that being poor is because you’re not working with enough dedication; that failing to move unmovable facts is because we didn’t try hard enough.

This isn’t to diss agency: it’s something worth striving for, it certainly is a useful writing tool and a useful prism for looking at stories. But, as with all tools and lenses, it’s worth taking a good, long hard look at it: it cannot be the only lens we view the world through; and above all it cannot be the only tool we use to build stories—lest it impoverish us all.

(I was going to gracefully insert my book, The House of Binding Thorns—which is about Fallen angels, dragons in human shapes, and communities in a ruined and decadent Paris—into this blog post, but I honestly can’t find a way, so I’m just going to do it the blatant way. Book was just released and I’d be very grateful if you gave it a go!)

 

Aliette de Bodard lives and works in Paris, where she has a day job as a System Engineer. She is the author of the critically acclaimed Obsidian and Blood trilogy of Aztec noir fantasies, as well as numerous short stories. Recent works include The House of Shattered Wings (Roc/Gollancz, 2015 British Science Fiction Association Award) and The House of Binding Thorns, novels set in a turn–of–the–century Paris devastated by a magical war, and “The Citadel of Weeping Pearls” (Asimov’s Oct/Nov 2015), a novella set in the same universe as her Vietnamese space opera On a Red Station Drifting.

Two Uncanny Stories, The Thomases, and Uncanny Magazine Are All Hugo Award Finalists!

Outstanding news, Space Unicorns! Two Uncanny Magazine stories are finalists for the prestigious Hugo Award! “Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies” by Brooke Bolander is a finalist for Best Short Story, and “You’ll Surely Drown Here If You Stay” by Alyssa Wong is a finalist for Best Novelette! As you may recall, these stories are also Nebula Award Finalists! Congratulations Brooke and Alyssa!

Even more excellent news! Uncanny Magazine (edited by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Julia Rios, and podcast produced by Erika Ensign & Steven Schapansky) is also once again a finalist for Best Semiprozine!

One more thing! Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas are finalists for the Best Editor- Short Form Hugo Award! This is their first time as finalists in this category. This is also the first time a couple has been nominated for an individual Hugo Award since Leo and Diane Dillon won the Best Professional Artist Hugo Award in 1971.

Finally, “Seasons of Glass and Iron” by Amal El-Mohtar from the Saga Press anthology The Starlit Wood (edited by Dominik Parisien and Navah Wolfe, who is also a Hugo finalist for Best Editor- Long Form), which we reprinted in Uncanny Magazine, is a finalist for Best Short Story, just like it was for the Nebula Award! Congratulations Amal and Navah!

It is an amazing list of Hugo Award finalists, many of whom are Uncanny authors and friends. CONGRATULATIONS TO EVERYBODY!!!

Below is the Hugo Award Press Release from Worldcon 75:

Hugo Award Finalists Announced

Worldcon 75 is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2017 Hugo Awards. With 108 finalists, this is the most extensive Hugo ballot on record. The Hugo Awards, first presented in 1953, celebrate the best in the field of science fiction and fantasy. Recipients are chosen by Worldcon members. The 2017 Hugos will be presented at the 75th World Science Fiction Convention in Helsinki, Finland, on 11 August 2017.

The convention officially announced the finalists via its social media feeds in a video featuring Guest of Honour Johanna Sinisalo; graphic novelist Petri Hiltunen; writer J. Pekka Mäkelä; translator Johanna Vainikainen; Worldcon 75 Chair Jukka Halme, and other members of the Worldcon 75 team.

2464 valid nominating ballots (2458 electronic and 6 paper) were received and counted from the members of the 2016, 2017 and 2018 World Science Fiction Conventions. The final round of voting will open in the week following this announcement and close on 15 July 2017. For more information about the awards and the voting process, consult our website at http://www.worldcon.fi/wsfs/hugo/.

The finalists are:

Best Novel

2078 ballots cast for 652 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 156 to 480.

All the Birds in the Sky, by Charlie Jane Anders (Tor Books / Titan Books)

A Closed and Common Orbit, by Becky Chambers (Hodder & Stoughton / Harper Voyager US)

Death’s End, by Cixin Liu (Tor Books / Head of Zeus)

Ninefox Gambit, by Yoon Ha Lee (Solaris Books)

The Obelisk Gate, by N. K. Jemisin (Orbit Books)

Too Like the Lightning, by Ada Palmer (Tor Books)

 

Best Novella

1410 ballots cast for 187 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 167 to 511.

The Ballad of Black Tom, by Victor LaValle (Tor.com publishing)

The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe, by Kij Johnson (Tor.com publishing)

Every Heart a Doorway, by Seanan McGuire (Tor.com publishing)

Penric and the Shaman, by Lois McMaster Bujold (Spectrum Literary Agency)

A Taste of Honey, by Kai Ashante Wilson (Tor.com publishing)

This Census-Taker, by China Miéville (Del Rey / Picador)

 

Best Novelette

1097 ballots cast for 295 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 74 to 268.

“Alien Stripper Boned From Behind By The T-Rex”, by Stix Hiscock (self-published)

“The Art of Space Travel”, by Nina Allan (Tor.com , July 2016)

“The Jewel and Her Lapidary”, by Fran Wilde (Tor.com, May 2016)

“The Tomato Thief”, by Ursula Vernon (Apex Magazine, January 2016)

“Touring with the Alien”, by Carolyn Ives Gilman (Clarkesworld Magazine, April 2016)

“You’ll Surely Drown Here If You Stay”, by Alyssa Wong (Uncanny Magazine, May 2016)

 

Best Short Story

1275 ballots cast for 830 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 87 to 182.

“The City Born Great”, by N. K. Jemisin (Tor.com, September 2016)

“A Fist of Permutations in Lightning and Wildflowers”, by Alyssa Wong (Tor.com, March 2016)

“Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies”, by Brooke Bolander (Uncanny Magazine, November 2016)

“Seasons of Glass and Iron”, by Amal El-Mohtar (The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales, Saga Press)

“That Game We Played During the War”, by Carrie Vaughn (Tor.com, March 2016)

“An Unimaginable Light”, by John C. Wright (God, Robot, Castalia House)

 

Best Related Work

1122 ballots cast for 344 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 88 to 424.

The Geek Feminist Revolution, by Kameron Hurley (Tor Books)

The Princess Diarist, by Carrie Fisher (Blue Rider Press)

Traveler of Worlds: Conversations with Robert Silverberg, by Robert Silverberg and Alvaro Zinos-Amaro (Fairwood)

The View From the Cheap Seats, by Neil Gaiman (William Morrow / Harper Collins)

The Women of Harry Potter posts, by Sarah Gailey (Tor.com)

Words Are My Matter: Writings About Life and Books, 2000-2016, by Ursula K. Le Guin (Small Beer)

 

Best Graphic Story

842 ballots cast for 441 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 71 to 221.

Black Panther, Volume 1: A Nation Under Our Feet, written by Ta-Nehisi Coates, illustrated by Brian Stelfreeze (Marvel)

Monstress, Volume 1: Awakening, written by Marjorie Liu, illustrated by Sana Takeda (Image)

Ms. Marvel, Volume 5: Super Famous, written by G. Willow Wilson, illustrated by Takeshi Miyazawa (Marvel)

Paper Girls, Volume 1, written by Brian K. Vaughan, illustrated by Cliff Chiang, colored by Matthew Wilson, lettered by Jared Fletcher (Image)

Saga, Volume 6, illustrated by Fiona Staples, written by Brian K. Vaughan, lettered by Fonografiks (Image)

The Vision, Volume 1: Little Worse Than A Man, written by Tom King, illustrated by Gabriel Hernandez Walta (Marvel)

 

Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form)

1733 ballots cast for 206 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 240 to 1030.

Arrival, screenplay by Eric Heisserer based on a short story by Ted Chiang, directed by Denis Villeneuve (21 Laps Entertainment/FilmNation Entertainment/Lava Bear Films)

Deadpool, screenplay by Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick, directed by Tim Miller (Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation/Marvel Entertainment/Kinberg Genre/The Donners’ Company/TSG Entertainment)

Ghostbusters, screenplay by Katie Dippold & Paul Feig, directed by Paul Feig (Columbia Pictures/LStar Capital/Village Roadshow Pictures/Pascal Pictures/Feigco Entertainment/Ghostcorps/The Montecito Picture Company)

Hidden Figures, screenplay by Allison Schroeder and Theodore Melfi, directed by Theodore Melfi (Fox 2000 Pictures/Chernin Entertainment/Levantine Films/TSG Entertainment)

Rogue One, screenplay by Chris Weitz and Tony Gilroy, directed by Gareth Edwards (Lucasfilm/Allison Shearmur Productions/Black Hangar Studios/Stereo D/Walt Disney Pictures)

Stranger Things, Season One, created by the Duffer Brothers (21 Laps Entertainment/Monkey Massacre)

 

Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form)

1159 ballots cast for 569 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 91 to 193.

Black Mirror: “San Junipero”, written by Charlie Brooker, directed by Owen Harris (House of Tomorrow)

Doctor Who: “The Return of Doctor Mysterio”, written by Steven Moffat, directed by Ed Bazalgette (BBC Cymru Wales)

The Expanse: “Leviathan Wakes”, written by Mark Fergus and Hawk Ostby, directed by Terry McDonough (SyFy)

Game of Thrones: “Battle of the Bastards”, written by David Benioff and D. B. Weiss, directed by Miguel Sapochnik (HBO)

Game of Thrones: “The Door”, written by David Benioff and D. B. Weiss, directed by Jack Bender (HBO)

Splendor & Misery [album], by Clipping (Daveed Diggs, William Hutson, Jonathan Snipes)

 

Best Editor – Short Form

951 ballots cast for 191 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 149 to 229.

John Joseph Adams

Neil Clarke

Ellen Datlow

Jonathan Strahan

Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas

Sheila Williams

 

Best Editor – Long Form

752 ballots cast for 148 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 83 to 201.

Vox Day

Sheila E. Gilbert

Liz Gorinsky

Devi Pillai

Miriam Weinberg

Navah Wolfe

 

Best Professional Artist

817 ballots cast for 387 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 53 to 143.

Galen Dara

Julie Dillon

Chris McGrath

Victo Ngai

John Picacio

Sana Takeda

 

Best Semiprozine

857 ballots cast for 103 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 80 to 434.

Beneath Ceaseless Skies, editor-in-chief and publisher Scott H. Andrews

Cirsova Heroic Fantasy and Science Fiction Magazine, edited by P. Alexander

GigaNotoSaurus, edited by Rashida J. Smith

Strange Horizons, edited by Niall Harrison, Catherine Krahe, Vajra Chandrasekera, Vanessa Rose Phin, Li Chua, Aishwarya Subramanian, Tim Moore, Anaea Lay, and the Strange Horizons staff

Uncanny Magazine, edited by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Julia Rios, and podcast produced by Erika Ensign & Steven Schapansky

The Book Smugglers, edited by Ana Grilo and Thea James

 

Best Fanzine

610 ballots cast for 152 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 53 to 159.

Castalia House Blog, edited by Jeffro Johnson

Journey Planet, edited by James Bacon, Chris Garcia, Esther MacCallum-Stewart, Helena Nash, Errick Nunnally, Pádraig Ó Méalóid, Chuck Serface, and Erin Underwood

Lady Business, edited by Clare, Ira, Jodie, KJ, Renay, and Susan

nerds of a feather, flock together, edited by The G, Vance Kotrla, and Joe Sherry

Rocket Stack Rank, edited by Greg Hullender and Eric Wong

SF Bluestocking, edited by Bridget McKinney

 

Best Fancast

690 ballots cast for 253 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 76 to 109.

The Coode Street Podcast, presented by Gary K. Wolfe and Jonathan Strahan

Ditch Diggers, presented by Mur Lafferty and Matt Wallace

Fangirl Happy Hour, presented by Ana Grilo and Renay Williams

Galactic Suburbia, presented by Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce and Tansy Rayner Roberts, produced by Andrew Finch

The Rageaholic, presented by RazörFist

Tea and Jeopardy, presented by Emma Newman with Peter Newman

 

Best Fan Writer

802 ballots cast for 275 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 80 to 152.

Mike Glyer

Jeffro Johnson

Natalie Luhrs

Foz Meadows

Abigail Nussbaum

Chuck Tingle

 

Best Fan Artist

528 ballots cast for 242 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 39 to 121.

Ninni Aalto

Alex Garner

Vesa Lehtimäki

Likhain (M. Sereno)

Spring Schoenhuth

Mansik Yang

 

Best Series

1393 votes for 290 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 129 to 325.

The Craft Sequence, by Max Gladstone (Tor Books)

The Expanse, by James S.A. Corey (Orbit US / Orbit UK)

The October Daye Books, by Seanan McGuire (DAW / Corsair)

The Peter Grant / Rivers of London series, by Ben Aaronovitch (Gollancz / Del Rey / DAW / Subterranean)

The Temeraire series, by Naomi Novik (Del Rey / Harper Voyager UK)

The Vorkosigan Saga, by Lois McMaster Bujold (Baen)

 

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer (937 ballots)

933 votes for 260 nominees.

Votes for finalists ranged from 88 to 255.

Sarah Gailey (1st year of eligibility)

J. Mulrooney (1st year of eligibility)

Malka Older (2nd year of eligibility)

Ada Palmer (1st year of eligibility)

Laurie Penny (2nd year of eligibility)

Kelly Robson (2nd year of eligibility)

Uncanny Magazine Issue 15 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming March 7, THE FIFTEENTH ISSUE OF 2016 HUGO AWARD-WINNING UNCANNY MAGAZINE!!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on April 4.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

 

Cover
Julie Dillon- “Submerged City”

Editorial
The Uncanny Valley (3/7)

Fiction
Beth Cato- “With Cardamom I’ll Bind Their Lips” (3/7)
Stephen Graham Jones- “Rising Star” (3/7)
JY Yang- “Auspicium Melioris Aevi” (3/7)

Sarah Pinsker- And Then There Were (N – One) (4/4)
S. Qiouyi Lu- An Abundance of Fish (4/4)

Reprint
Kameron Hurley- “The Red Secretary” (4/4)

Nonfiction
Sam J. Miller- “Resistance 101: Basics of Community Organizing for SF/F Creators & Consumers, Volume One: Protest Tips and Tricks” (3/7)
Elsa Sjunneson-Henry- “Act Up, Rise Up” (3/7)

Shveta Thakrar- “#beautifulresistance” (4/4)
Dawn Xiana Moon- “A Work of Art Is a Refuge and Resistance” (4/4)
Paul Booth – “Fandom in the Classroom” (4/4)

Poetry
Cassandra Khaw- “Protestations Against the Idea of Anglicization” (3/7)
Brandon O’Brien- “time, and time again” (3/7)

Bogi Takács- “The Size of a Barleycorn, Encased in Lead” (4/4)
Lisa M. Bradley- “The Axolotl Inquest” (4/4)

Interviews
Stephen Graham Jones by Julia Rios (3/7)

Sarah Pinsker by Julia Rios (4/4)

Podcast 15A (3/7)
Story- Beth Cato- “With Cardamom I’ll Bind Their Lips” (As read by Erika Ensign)
Poem- Cassandra Khaw- “Protestations Against the Idea of Anglicization” (As read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Interview- Beth Cato by Julia Rios

Podcast 15B (4/4)
Story- JY Yang- “Auspicium Melioris Aevi” (As read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Poem- Lisa M. Bradley- “The Axolotl Inquest” (As read by Erika Ensign)
Interview- JY Yang by Julia Rios

Two Uncanny Magazine Stories are Nebula Award Finalists!

Outstanding news, Space Unicorns! Two Uncanny Magazine stories are finalists for the prestigious Nebula Award from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America! “Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies” by Brooke Bolander is a finalist for Best Short Story, and “You’ll Surely Drown Here If You Stay” by Alyssa Wong is a finalist for Best Novelette! As you may recall, these were the top two stories in our 2016 Favorite Fiction Reader Poll! Also, “Seasons of Glass and Iron” by Amal El-Mohtar from the Saga Press anthology The Starlit Wood (edited by Dominik Parisien and Navah Wolfe), which we reprinted in Uncanny Magazine, is a finalist for Best Short Story! Congratulations Brooke, Alyssa, and Amal!

These are the first stories ever from Uncanny Magazine to become Nebula Award finalists, and we couldn’t be more excited! It is an amazing list of finalists, many of whom are Uncanny authors and friends. CONGRATULATIONS TO EVERYBODY!!!

From the SFWA Nebula Award announcement:

Voting will begin on the final ballot for all Active, Active Family, and Lifetime Active members on March 1st, 2017. The awards will be presented during the annual Nebula Conference, which will run from May 18th-21st and feature seminars and panel discussions on the craft and business of writing, SFWA’s annual business meeting, and receptions. On May 19th, a mass autograph session, open to the public, will take place at the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center.

Uncanny Magazine 2016 Favorite Fiction Reader Poll Results!

Space Unicorns! It is time to announce the TOP STORY in our Uncanny Magazine 2016 Favorite Fiction Reader Poll!
It is…. *drumroll*
Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies” by Brooke Bolander!!!
Congratulations, Brooke! Brooke will be receiving a SNAZZY CERTIFICATE!
The rest of the Top Five are:
4- “The Green Knight’s Wife” by Kat Howard
5- “The Sound of Salt and Sea” by Kat Howard
Congratulations to Alyssa, Lily, and Kat!
Thank you to everybody who voted!
Don’t forget if you’re nominating for the Nebula or Hugo Awards, we have a list of all of our eligible stories here.

Liz Argall’s Things React to Monster Girls Don’t Cry

As you may remember, one of the stretch goals for the Uncanny Magazine Year Three Kickstarter was a continuation of our webcomic feature. Each issue, the multi-talented Liz Argall will have a special Uncanny edition of her webcomic Things Without Arms and Without Legs where they react to a piece in the current issue of Uncanny Magazine.

For Issue 14, Liz’s Things react to “Monster Girls Don’t Cry” by A. Merc Rustad!

Uncanny Celebrates Reader Favorites of 2016!

Happy New Year, Space Unicorns! 2016 was an incredible year and we’re excited to see where we’ll go in 2017. Everyone in the Space Unicorn Ranger Corps has been wonderfully supportive and your enthusiasm has meant so much to us. It’s been fantastic to see how much our readers have been enjoying Uncanny’s fiction and while we have our personal favorites, we’d like to know which stories YOU loved from Uncanny in 2016.

We’ve set up a poll for Uncanny readers to vote for their top three favorite original short stories from 2016. (You can find links to all of the stories here.) The poll will be open from January 9 to January 30, after which we’ll announce the results. We will also be running polls to ask what your favorite poems, nonfiction, and cover art were in the following weeks. We’re excited for you to share which Uncanny stories, poems, nonfiction, and art made you feel!

snazzy certificate will be given to the creators whose work comes out on top of each poll!

Did you know Uncanny Magazine is on Instagram? Follow us at @uncanny_magazine! We’ll be highlighting our favorite quotes from Uncanny’s short fiction from 2016. Starting on Monday, January 9, we’ll post those quotes on Instagram!

Uncanny Magazine Issue 14 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming January 3, THE FOURTEENTH ISSUE OF 2016 HUGO AWARD-WINNING UNCANNY MAGAZINE!!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on February 7.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

Uncanny Magazine Issue 14 Table of Contents

Cover
John Picacio- “El Arpa”

Editorial
The Uncanny Valley

Fiction
Sam J. Miller- “Bodies Stacked Like Firewood” (1/3)
A. Merc Rustad- “Monster Girls Don’t Cry” (1/3)
Cassandra Khaw- “Goddess, Worm” (1/3)

Maria Dahvana Headley- “The Thule Stowaway” (2/7)
Theodora Goss- “To Budapest, with Love” (2/7)
Tansy Rayner Roberts- “Some Cupids Kill With Arrows” (2/7)

Reprint
Ann Leckie- “The Unknown God” (2/7)

Nonfiction
Mark Oshiro- Inferior Beasts (1/3)
Natalie Luhrs- “Why You Should Read Romance” (1/3)

Delilah S. Dawson- “I Have Never Not Been an Object” (2/7)
Angel Cruz- “Blood of the Revolution: On Filipina Writers and Aswang” (2/7)

Poetry
Carlos Hernandez- “In Lieu of the Stories My Santera Abuela Should Have Told Me Herself, This Poem” (1/3)
Nin Harris- “Jean-Luc, Future Ghost” (1/3)

Nicasio Andres Reed- “Except Thou Bless Me” (2/7)

Interviews
A. Merc Rustad by Julia Rios (1/3)

Maria Dahvana Headley by Julia Rios (2/7)

Podcast 14A (1/3)
Story- Sam J. Miller- “Bodies Stacked Like Firewood” (As read by Erika Ensign)
Poem- Carlos Hernandez- “In Lieu of the Stories My Santera Abuela Should Have Told Me Herself, This Poem” (As read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Interview- Sam J. Miller by Julia Rios

Podcast 14B (2/7)
Story- Theodora Goss- “To Budapest, with Love” (As read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Story- Tansy Rayner Roberts- “Some Cupids Kill With Arrows” (As read by Erika Ensign)
Poem- Nicasio Andres Reed- “Except Thou Bless Me” (As read by Erika Ensign)
Interview- Theodora Goss by Julia Rios

Uncanny Magazine Issue 13 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming November 1, THE THIRTEENTH ISSUE OF 2016 HUGO AWARD-WINNING UNCANNY MAGAZINE!!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on December 6th.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

issue13coverv2_large

Uncanny Magazine Issue 13 Table of Contents

Cover
Julie Dillon “Impact Crater”

Editorial
The Uncanny Valley (11/1)

Fiction
Paul Cornell- “Don’t You Worry, You Aliens” (11/1)
Brooke Bolander- “Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies” (11/1)
Jennifer Marie Brissett- “Kamanti’s Child” (11/1)

Alex Bledsoe- “White Hart, Black Knight” (12/6)
Kat Howard- “The Green Knight’s Wife” (12/6)
Nalo Hopkinson- “Can’t Beat ‘Em” (12/6)

Reprint
Amal El-Mohtar- “Seasons of Glass and Iron” (11/1)

Nonfiction
Alyssa Wong- “They Love Me Not: How Fictional Villains Saved My Life” (11/1)
Monica Valentinelli- “We Have Always Been Here, Motherfucker” (11/1)
Navah Wolfe- “A Saga of Ink and Tea: Welcome to the Woods” (11/1)

Tansy Rayner Roberts- “How The Avengers Killed the Justice League” (12/6)
Keidra Chaney- “Living, working, and Fangirling with a Chronic Illness” (12/6)
Hao Jingfang (Translated by Ken Liu)- “I Wanted to Write a History of Inequality” (12/6)

Poetry
Neil Gaiman- “The Long Run” (11/1)
Theodora Goss- “Rose Child” (11/1)

Sofia Samatar – “Blue Flowers: Fragments” (12/6)

Interviews
Jennifer Marie Brissett Interviewed by Julia Rios (11/1)
Alex Bledsoe Interviewed by Julia Rios (12/6)

Podcast 13A (11/1)
Stories
Paul Cornell- “Don’t You Worry, You Aliens” (Read by Heath Miller)
Brooke Bolander- “Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies” (Read by Erika Ensign)
Poem:
Theodora Goss- “Rose Child” (Read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Interview:
Brooke Bolander Interviewed by Deborah Stanish

Podcast 13B (12/6)
Stories:
Kat Howard- “The Green Knight’s Wife” (Read by Erika Ensign)
Nalo Hopkinson- “Can’t Beat ‘Em” (Read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Poem:
Sofia Samatar – “Blue Flowers: Fragments” (Read by Amal El-Mohtar)
Interview:
Tansy Rayner Roberts Interviewed by Deborah Stanish